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Setting up ruTorrent in Docker on a Synology NAS

In this guide I will take you through the steps required to get ruTorrent up and running on your Synology NAS, I will be making some assumptions that you know your way around the DSM interface but if you any specific questions let me know in the comments.

Downloading the Container

In the majority of my guides I use the containers made by Linux|Server, these have very good documentation and are very well maintained so should any issues arise there is a group of people to ask, plus these work really well on Synology.

Open up Docker within DSM and navigate to the ‘Registry’ section and search for ruTorrent in the keyword box. Right click and download the Linux|Server version. When it asks which version number you want to use just choose latest this will ensure the container updates to new versions when they are released.

rutorrent1

PUID and PGID

In order for the docker container to access the shares on the NAS we need to give it the same permissions as a user who has access to those shares, we achieve this by associating the correct Personal User ID and Personal Group ID to the container.

You will need to SSH into your Diskstation using ‘Putty’ or an equivalent program.

Open up Putty, the only thing you need to enter is the IP address of your NAS and select the SSH radio button.

putty

Click on open, you will get a prompt asking if you trust the key, if this is the first time you have used SSH, just press OK or accept.

Enter the login information for you Synology user account, you will not be able to see the password as you type it, I use a very long one so I just paste it in from my password manager. (right click acts as paste in putty)

Once logged in type ‘id’ without the quotes and this will show your UID(aka PUID) which in my case is 1026 and the GID(aka PGID) which is 101 for an administrator

putty02

Setting up the Container

Back in the ‘Image’ menu highlight the ruTorrent container and click on Launch. This will open up the setup wizard.

On the first screen I am not making any changes as I do not need to limit the resources on my 1815+ as I have 6GB of RAM, just go straight into ‘Advanced Settings’.

rutorrent4

Tick the ‘Enable Auto Restart’ this will ensure the container starts up automatically if you reboot.

rutorrent5

On the ‘Volume’ tab you need to add the paths to where you want to keep the config files and where you want all your downloads to take place.

I would recommend creating a ruTorrent folder within the main Docker directory the  same goes for any of my other guides this means you can store all the config files outsite of the container, meaning you have easy access to modify and backup, this will save you a ton of time if you ever have to start from fresh. See the image below for the setup.

rutorrent6

Next we move to the Port Settings tab, this is where you need to configure the various ports required by ruTorrent to both function correctly and allow you to access the web interface. There a quite a few ports used for Torrents for this tutorial with are leaving everything on Auto with the exception of port 80 which is used for the webUI,you must give this an alternative port number in this case I used 49999.

rutorrent9

Last up is the Environment Variables, this is where we enter the details obtained earlier for our PGID and PUID values, all you need to do is enter the details as shown in the screenshot below, this will ensure you have full access to the shares we added earlier.

PGID and PUID Values

Now just click OK and you will be back at the first screen we saw, then click next to see a summary of your setup. You are now ready to roll and can start the container. On first startup it may take a minute of so for everything to setup you can see the status in the logs, you can then access the ruTorrent WebUI via the NAS IP and  port you entered earlier.

rutorrent10

Published inDockerSynology

15 Comments

  1. Crimsonsage Crimsonsage

    This guide was great (just as your others were), but I’m running into one issue. ruTorrent tells me that port 45566 is closed (Default listening port). I’ve tried opening this port on the Synology Firewall, and also on my Router. I know that within docker it’s port 45566, but the “local” port is set to “auto”. I tried manually setting that local port to a specific value, and forwarding it on both the synology and router.. still no luck.

    Any suggestions on the port forwarding?

  2. Amareto Amareto

    Hi, nice site and guides. Why do you prefer ruTorrent over Deluge?

    • Dr_Frankenstein Dr_Frankenstein

      I don’t really use torrents so this was to cover a request from a Reddit user. I can do a Deluge write up. I just need to test it and make sure it’s working first.

      • NG80 NG80

        Did you manage to get Deluge Docker working on Synology? I’d be interested to read your guide on this!

        • Dr_Frankenstein Dr_Frankenstein

          I have been extremely busy the last couple of months. It’s still on the pad.

  3. YOUROCK YOUROCK

    You ROCK!!!!! TY!!! I can now download MASSIVE torrent files!!

  4. brp brp

    Thanks very much for the guide!

    I’m testing this now, and so far it’s been working pretty well.

    Download station has an issue where the auto-extract feature is SLOW as hell, but it is super fast now when using the RUTorrent auto-extract.

    The one issue I see is that the RUTorrent auto-extract feature doesn’t have the option to auto-delete the archives once done extracting. The Synology Download Station does have this feature. Do you know anyway to get this working on my Synology Box?

  5. Pat Pat

    Your screenshot of the environmental variables shows an incorrect variable for the group ID. The correct variable is PGID like you mentioned in the written portion. The screenshot shows GUID, which does nothing. It looks like the same mistake is in all guides

    • Dr_Frankenstein Dr_Frankenstein

      Hi Pat I will double check the screen shots as I swear I fixed these once already.

      — Update I fixed it, looks like an old screen shot snuck in!

  6. Kevin Kevin

    I’ve been reading through all your guides as I get ready to start deploying some docker containers. I have two questions.

    1) Do you recommend creating a specific user to be used for all the docker containers? Or are you using something like admin?

    2) If I am not mistaken, when using bridged connections you can specify the ports to be the same. For example for SABnzb you can use 8080 for both the local and container ports. Is there a reason you do not do this?

    Otherwise, great work on these, The efforts of people like you are a tremendous asset to the community,

    • Dr_Frankenstein Dr_Frankenstein

      1) I just use my default admin login (not the actual user called ‘admin’ as that is disabled on my setup for security) you can use whoever you like as long as they have access to the shares you want to add to the containers.

      2) When I first started writing the guides I was port forwarding to the Internet so I would tend to change to a random port number just to obfuscate the connection, in case anyone was trying known ports to get into the NAS. I now use the VPN server and just VPN into my network. So you can use whatever ports you want, either the same ones as the original container or make them up. You will find some ports are already used by DSM for those cases you may want to use a bridge or just use a different port. (I have not used a bridge yet so I may have a play around)

      Glad everyone is finding these useful, I am learning as I go and thought I would share my knowledge (good time to use the domain I have owned for 15 odd years!)

      • Kevin Kevin

        Appreciate the quick response. Very helpful. I hope to carve out some time to get this going over the weekend. Going to give Radarr a try.

  7. Chris Chris

    Thank you for this setup guide, it’s been a great help. I’m rebuilding my 1815+ and I’m trying to use the Docker route for my installs. When I set up the Synocommunity build of rutorrent, there was a problem with _getdir and viewing the file structure, which I got around by using symlinks. However, no luck here.
    To my questions – can you imagine a way to link a Shared folder on an external drive (USB) so that rutorrent can access it. If I add the volume in the DockerGUI it doesn’t work, the container won’t start. But using a symlink to the folder doesn’t work either. It doesn’t show in the directory browser (in rutorrent) although the link is in the /downloads folder.
    Any ideas on where to look?

  8. matty matty

    Nice tut, thank you.
    Two already mentioned things:
    – Ports not working
    – delete the .rars after extracting
    who could help here?

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